Roles of the President
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Roles of the President

The president is the chief of state. He acts as the ceremonial head of the government. He greets diplomats, royalty, and other heads of state from all over the world. He commemorates, gives medals, speeches, holds state dinners, lights the nationÂ’s Christmas tree, and more. He is the symbol of the sovereignty of the United States

The president is the chief of state. He acts as the ceremonial head of the government. He greets diplomats, royalty, and other heads of state from all over the world. He commemorates, gives medals, speeches, holds state dinners, lights the nation’s Christmas tree, and more. He is the symbol of the sovereignty of the United States.

The President is Chief Executive. He runs the Executive branch, supervising daily activities. He has the power of appointment with the consent of the Senate and, the power of removal if he is not satisfied with an appointee, who is directly under his command, not executing the laws faithfully, consistent with his own policies.

The President is Commander in Chief. He is the supreme commander of the armed forces. He raises, trains, supervises and deploys troops; moreover, he will be held responsible for the nation’s readiness to meet an enemy assault.

The President is Chief Diplomat. John Marshall, in 1799, described this role of the President as the “sole organ of the nation in its external relations.” The President as Chief Diplomat is responsible for policy making and the conduct of affairs. He negotiates treaties, executive agreements, recognizes new governments and nations, selects and supervises diplomatic personnel, communicates with foreign powers, and more.

The President is Chief Legislature and, expected to guide Congress in much of its lawmaking. Laws are drafted in the President’s office, and made law by his signature. It is his responsibility to bridge the gap between the executive and legislative branches. The main concern of the President, as Chief Legislature, is to push for his or his party’s own legislative desires.

Aside from Constitutional duties, the President’s duties include the role of Chief of Party, which is purely political, and not constitutional.

The president is the Voice of the People, serving as the spokesman and formulator of public opinion – speaking for no special interest, but for the whole of the people.

The president is the Protector of the Peace. In times of panic, such as 9/11, Katrina, the current economy, the people turn to the White House for aid and comfort. The president is empowered to meet a future challenge of panic.

The president is Manager of Prosperity – set forth by the Employment Act of 1946, acknowledging the responsibility of the federal government for maintaining a stable economy, and to promote maximum employment, production, and purchasing power. He has a Council of Economic Advisors and makes an annual Economic Report.

The president is a World Leader and Leader of the Free World, which relates to the aforementioned roles.

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